Saturday, 31 August 2019

1092) Frederick Samuel Dellenbaugh

Frederick Samuel Dellenbaugh (1853–1935). American explorer.
An explorer of the American West at an early age, he was a member of an expedition that discovered the last unknown river in the United States, the Escalante River and the previously undiscovered Henry Mountains.
From 1871 to 1873, he was artist and assistant topographer with Major Powell's second expedition down the Colorado River. He joined the 1899 Harriman Alaska Expedition financed by railroad magnate E. H. Harriman. He served as librarian of the American Geographical Society (1909–1911) and became a fellow of the American Ethnological Society. He helped to found the Explorers Club in 1904.

- "... Frederick Dallenbaugh, well-to-do son of a physician, handsome with a shock of dark red hair, adept at pencil and brush."  https://books.google.it/books…



1091) John Wesley Powell

John Wesley Powell (1834 – 1902). U.S. soldier, geologist, explorer of the American West, professor at Illinois Wesleyan University, and director of major scientific and cultural institutions. He is famous for the 1869 Powell Geographic Expedition, a three-month river trip down the Green and Colorado rivers, including the first official U.S. government-sponsored passage through the Grand Canyon.
Powell served as second director of the U.S. Geological Survey (1881–1894) and proposed, for development of the arid West, policies that were prescient for his accurate evaluation of conditions. He became the first director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution during his service as director of the U.S. Geological Survey, where he supported linguistic and sociological research and publications.

- "John Wesley Powell, a bluff, daring, one-armed, red-haired giant, was not only the first white man to traverse the lenght of the dangerous Colorado canyon..."  https://books.google.it/books…



1090) James Angell MacLachlan

James Angell MacLachlan (1891-1967). Son of historian and Pulitzer Prize winner Andrew C. McLaughlin and Lois Thompson Angell. He was a Harvard Law School professor and co-founder of the National Bankruptcy Conference of 1932. He legally changed his surname to MacLachlan in 1952.

- "In appearance he is the prototypical Scotch patriarch: short, barrel-chested with blondered, tousled hair set off by quick eyes and russet cheeks."  https://repository.law.umich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi…

- "... my property teacher was James Angell MacLachlan, nicknamed Red because of his (fading) shock of red hair.https://books.google.it/books…



1089) Augustus Saint-Gaudens

Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1848 – 1907). American sculptor of the Beaux-Arts generation who embodied the ideals of the American Renaissance. Raised in New York City, he traveled to Europe for further training and artistic study, and then returned to New York, where he achieved major critical success for his monuments commemorating heroes of the American Civil War, many of which still stand. Saint-Gaudens created works such as the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial on Boston Common and grand equestrian monuments to Civil War Generals: General John Logan Memorial in Chicago's Grant Park and William Tecumseh Sherman at the corner of New York's Central Park.
Saint-Gaudens also created Classical works such as the Diana, and employed his skills in numismatics. Most notably, he designed the $20 Saint Gaudens Double Eagle gold piece (1905–1907) for the US Mint, considered one of the most beautiful American coins ever issued as well as the $10 "Indian Head" gold eagle, both of which were minted from 1907 until 1933. In his later years he founded the "Cornish Colony", an artistic colony that included notable painters, sculptors, writers, and architects. 


- "Born in Dublin of an Irish mother and a French father, the red haired Saint-Gaudens, when only six months old was brought to the United States to escape the horrors of the Irish potato famine of 1848."   https://buffaloah.com/a/elmwd/1285/s-g/index.html

- "They became fast friends, sharing many things beyond their red hair.https://books.google.it/books…

- “Red-headed, whopper-jawed, and hopeful,” as he described himself..."  https://www.americanheritage.com/saint-gaudens



1088) Allanah Harper

Allanah Harper (1904 – 1992). English author. She is best known for founding the journal Echanges (Exchanges) and for her 1948 autobiography.
The Des Moines Register wrote that her autobiographical, All Trivial Fond Records, "may well be the most charming book of the year." The Chicago Tribune wrote that "Miss Harper's account of her Edwardian childhood and Georgian youth is one of the most delightful we have read in a long time."

- "... a rather handsome middle-aged citizeness in red hair, cigarette-holder and slacks... she was the Allanah Harper, former editor of Echanges..."  https://books.google.it/books…



1087) Isidore Miller

Isidore Miller (1884 - 1966). Father of the Pulitzer Prize winning American playwright and essayist, Arthur Asher Miller, who became the final husband of Hollywood star Marilyn Monroe. Isidore's youngest child became the famous actress Joan Copeland.
He was born in Radomyśl Wielki, Galicia (then part of Austria-Hungary, now Poland) in a Jewish family and emigrated to the US in 1891. In 1918 he started a women's clothing manufacturing business in Harlem, employing 400 people, but they lost almost everything in the crash of 1929.

- "... grew up to be six feet two inches tall with blue eyes and red hair and everybody thought he was an Irishman.https://books.google.it/books…



1086) Bess Furman

Bess Furman (1894–1969). American reporter who covered the FDR White House, especially Eleanor Roosevelt, and became one of the best-known women reporters of her day.
Between 1920 and 1929 she wrote for various Nebraska publications. She was a staff write at the Kearney Daily Hub and a news feature writer and Sunday magazine writer for the Omaha Bee-News. In 1928 her award-winning a story on presidential candidate Alfred E. Smith caught the eye of the Associated Press. Furman, anxious to make a name for herself outside of Nebraska, joined the AP’s Washington bureau in 1929. She was the first woman to regularly cover the House of Representatives for a news agency. Her main assignments were to cover first ladies Lou Hoover and Eleanor Roosevelt and FDR’s campaign activities.
During World War II she worked in the Office of War Information as assistant chief of the Magazine Division. From 1943 to 1961 she worked for the Washington bureau of the New York Times. Throughout this period she became increasingly interested in covering education, health, and science. In 1961 she began working in the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and was made head of its Press Information Section the following year.


- "Red-haired and assertive, Furman showed her skill at covering political figures when she won a prize for a story on Alfred E. Smith..."  https://books.google.it/books…



1085) Hallie Flanagan

Hallie Flanagan Davis (née Ferguson, 1889 – 1969). American theatrical producer and director, playwright, and author, best known as director of the Federal Theatre Project, a part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA).

- "Born in 1890, red-haired Hallie Ferguson spent her first ten years in a South Dakota town, often staging plays in the living room with her brothers and sisters."  https://www.ontheissuesmagazine.com/cafe2.php?id=137

- "Hallie Flanagan, a diminutive, red-haired academic theatre artist..."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "The 'small, red-haired lady with the firm mouth and the ferocity of a roused lion' as John Houseman once described her..."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "Pert, red-haired, dinamic, fiery Flanagan was controversial from the beginning."  https://books.google.it/books…



1084) Ellen Emmet Rand

Ellen Emmet Rand (also Ellen (Bay) Gertrude Emmet (Rand); 1875 – 1941). American painter and illustrator. She specialized in portraits, painting over 500 works during her career including portraits of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, artist Augustus Saint-Gaudens and her cousins Henry James and William James. Rand studied at the Cowles Art School in Boston and the Art Students League in New York City and produced illustrations for Vogue Magazine and Harper's Weekly before traveling to England and then France to study with sculptor Frederick William MacMonnies.

- "She was hardworking, robust, with masses of bright red hair, profoundly political, unpretentious and vigorously cheerful."  https://books.google.it/books…



1083) Anzia Yezierska

Anzia Yezierska (1880 - 1970). Polish-American novelist.
Yezierska wrote about the struggles of Jewish and later Puerto Rican immigrants in New York's Lower East Side. In her fifty-year writing career, she explored the cost of acculturation and assimilation among immigrants. Her stories provide insight into the meaning of liberation for immigrants—particularly Jewish immigrant women. Many of her works of fiction can be labeled semi-autobiographical. In her writing, she drew from her life growing up as an immigrant in New York's Lower East Side. Her works feature elements of realism with attention to detail; she often has characters express themselves in Yiddish-English dialect. Her sentimentalism and highly idealized characters have prompted some critics to classify her works as romantic.

- "They were very different- he the cold New Englander, she the passionate and exotic Polish Jew with flaming red hair."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "Dewey read and was impressed by her work, and became enamored with his red-headed, passionate young student."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "Burning-eyed and red-haired, she cornered him in his office..."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "... which turned out to be evidence of the improbable passionate affair between the American philosopher and the red-haired immigrant."  http://americanjewisharchives.org/…/1990_42_02_00_reviews.p…

- "... this frank red-haired lady storyteller was a public relations triumph."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "She was a beautiful young woman with blue eyes, red hair and lovely complexion..."  https://books.google.it/books…



1082) Rose Pastor Stokes

Rose Harriet Pastor Stokes (née Wieslander; 1879 – 1933). American socialist activist, writer, birth control advocate, and feminist. She was a figure of some public notoriety after her 1905 marriage to Episcopal millionaire J. G. Phelps Stokes, a member of elite New York society, who supported the settlements in New York. Together they joined the Socialist Party. Pastor Stokes continued to be active in labor politics and women's issues, including promoting access to birth control, which was highly controversial at the time.
In 1919, Pastor Stokes was a founding member of the Communist Party of America and helped develop it into the 1930s. In addition to her writing on politics, she wrote poetry and plays; one was produced in 1916 by the Washington Square Players.


- "Rose Pastor Stokes was there in her blazing coif of red hair, shouting, "Arise! Unite! Down with the bosses!"  https://books.google.it/books…



1081) Maud O'Farrell Swartz

Maud Swartz (née O'Farrell, 1879-1937). Irish-born American labor organizer who worked to improve the lives of women and children. She served as president of the Women's Trade Union League from 1922 to 1926. In 1931 she was appointed secretary of the New York State Department of Labor under Industrial Commissioner Frances Perkins. She was the first woman and the first trade unionist to hold that position.
In 1912 she met Rose Schneiderman, with whom she had a close friendship until her death. In the 1920s, she and Schneiderman befriended Eleanor Roosevelt, who had joined the WTUL They often visited the Roosevelts and discussed labor problems.

- "Still, in 1926 Eleanor took the risk, because she believed that the two red-headed labor organizers had important insights to ofer her husband."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "Swartz was a red-haired, sharp-tongued Irish-born printer with a genius for administration."   https://books.google.it/books…



1080) Margaret Foley

Margaret Lillian Foley (1875 - 1957). Irish-born American labor organizer, suffragist, and social worker from Boston. Known for confronting anti-suffrage candidates at political rallies, she was nicknamed the "Grand Heckler."

- "Organizers like Margaret Foley, five-foot-eight with flaming red hair, agitated in behalf of women from any podium she could find..."  https://books.google.it/books…



1079) Robert E. McLaughlin

Robert Emmet McLaughlin (1908 – 1973). American journalist and author. He was an editor at Time magazine for more than 20 years (1948–1969). He was the author of numerous short stories, three novels and The Heartland, volume in the Time-Life Library of America series.
He came to prominence during WW-II with his short stories about army life in the New Yorker.
Following the war, he joined the staff of Time magazine as a contributing editor. He remained there for more than twenty years, working in 23 of the magazine's departments.
In addition to his short stories, he was the author of three novels, The Side of the Angels (1947), The Walls of Heaven (1951), and The Notion of Sin (1959).


- "Robert E. McLaughlin, a red-headed divorcé from Chicago, was writing short stories for The New Yorker during the summer of 1940..."  https://books.google.it/books…

Friday, 30 August 2019

1078) Al Jennings

Alphonso J. "Al" Jennings (1863 – 1961). Attorney in Oklahoma Territory who at one time robbed trains. He later became a silent film star and made many appearances in films as an actor and technical adviser.
In 1913 he wrote Beating Back, a novel loosely based on his outlaw life. This novel portrayed the law as persecutors of the innocent and Jennings as an honorable lawbreaker who possessed immense skills in horsemanship and marksmanship. To coincide with this novel, The Saturday Evening Post wrote a series of interviews with Jennings that perpetuated the same messages as his novel. He re-created one of his bank robberies in the 1908 film The Bank Robbery.
Jennings moved to Oklahoma City in 1911 and became active in politics. In 1912 he won the Democratic nomination for Oklahoma County attorney, but he lost the general election.
Retiring from law and politics, Jennings moved to California and worked in the motion picture industry making Westerns. A film biography of him was made in 1951, Al Jennings of Oklahoma, with Dan Duryea in the title role.


- "Although some of the gang wanted to surrender, Mrs. Harless said the short bandit with the red hair - that was Al - said he'd rather die first."  https://www.coopertoons.com/caricatures/aljennings_bio.html

- "He had a head of fiery red hair and a dynamic way of speaking."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "Al Jennings’s distinctive red hair made him easily recognizable even when masked, and he was captured in 1897."  http://fayllar.org/clara-bow-in-mantrap-victor-fleming-1926…



1077) Merna Kennedy

Merna Kennedy (born Maude Kahler; 1908 – 1944). American actress of the late silent era and the transitional period into talkies.
Kennedy was best known during her brief career for her role opposite Charlie Chaplin in the silent film The Circus (1928). A dancer, she had muscular legs which helped her gain the role of the circus bareback rider.
She continued acting after The Circus, starring in early sound films, but retired in 1934 when she married choreographer/director Busby Berkeley.
She starred in the fhe first feature-length film to feature child actress Shirley Temple in the credits, the 1932 film The Red-Haired Alibi.


- "Merna Kennedy–17–with radiant red hair and green eyes.http://discoveringchaplin.com/2014/09/random-excerpt.html

- "According to a movie magazine of the time Merna was a green eyed, red haired, 100 lbs. tomboy who was not a fan of flappers and hated being called one."  http://silenceisplatinum.blogspot.com/…/…/merna-kennedy.html

- "Her brick-red hair and blue-green eyes appeared more than just pretty."  https://books.google.it/books…

- "Screen tests followed, of course, and the vivaciousness and charm of the red-haired lady with the green eyes registerd with Charlie."  https://books.google.it/books…



1076) Ellen Axson Wilson

Ellen Louise Axson Wilson (née Axson; 1860 – 1914). First wife of USA President Woodrow Wilson and mother of their three daughters. Having an artistic bent, she studied at the Art Students League of New York before her marriage, and continued to produce art in later life.
She was the First Lady of the United States from Wilson's inauguration in 1913 until her death. During that period, she arranged White House weddings for two of their daughters.

- "She was 5’3” tall, with dark reddish brown hair, piled high in a pompadour style, away from her face, and brown eyes."  http://vert-el-sels.blogspot.com/…/all-presidents-wives-26.…

- "A beautiful woman, with brilliant auburn hair, dark eyes and a gentle manner..."  https://books.google.it/books…



1075) Carmelita Torres

Carmelita Torres (1900 - ?). Mexican woman known for starting the 1917 Bath riots on the Mexico-United States border between Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua and El Paso, Texas. At the time of the riots, she was 17 years old and working as a maid in the United States. She has been called "the Latina Rosa Parks".

- "Carmelita Torres was the "red-haired Mexican woman"..."  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmelita_Torres

- “Led by Carmelita Torres, an auburn-haired young woman of 17..."  https://www.zinnedproject.org/mater…/women-in-labor-history/

- "Described as an “auburn-haired amazon,” Torres, just a teenage girl at the time, initiated a little-known revolt called the bath riot.https://wearemitu.com/…/remembering-carmelita-torres-the-t…/

- "Auburn-haired amazon at Santa Fe Street Bridge leads feminine outbreak."  https://texashistory.unt.edu/…/67…/metapth198630/m1/1/zoom/…



1074) Elizabeth Gurley Flynn

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (1890 – 1964). American labor leader, activist, and feminist who played a leading role in the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Flynn was a founding member of the American Civil Liberties Union and a visible proponent of women's rights, birth control, and women's suffrage. She joined the Communist Party USA in 1936 and late in life, in 1961, became its chairwoman.

- "There he met the legendary working-class leader, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, an organizer from the IWW, whose stirring oratory and boundless courage combined with her flaming red hair and alabaster skin..."  https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search…

- "Flynn, a striking auburn-haired 19-year-old, was a few weeks pregnant when she came to Missoula in September of 1909."  https://libcom.org/history/1909-missoula-free-speech-fight

- "Within weeks, the pregnant, auburn-haired beauty would be carrying out her mission on a bigger stage..."  https://books.google.it/books…



Thursday, 29 August 2019

1073) Robert Penn Warren

Robert Penn Warren (1905 – 1989). American poet, novelist, and literary critic and was one of the founders of New Criticism. He was also a charter member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. He founded the literary journal The Southern Review with Cleanth Brooks in 1935. He received the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for the Novel for his novel All the King's Men (1946) and the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1958 and 1979. He is the only person to have won Pulitzer Prizes for both fiction and poetry.

- "To his friends he was ''Red,'' from the color of his hair.http://movies2.nytimes.com/…/gener…/onthisday/bday/0424.html

- “Red” Warren, as his fellow poets knew him for the shock of red hair he had as a younger man, was 84."  https://www.latimes.com/…/la-xpm-1989-09-16-mn-151-story.ht…

- "In his small Kentucky hometown, he was the gangly, red-haired boy with a flair for poetry..."  https://www.ket.org/arts/robert-penn-warren-vision/

- "He had a long, quivering nose, large brown eyes and a long chin, all topped by curly red hair.https://books.google.it/books…